Out of the Past – May 2017

Vol. 1, Issue 5

75 Years Ago – 1942

May 7th
Caesar, the Great Dane, was released after one year in confinement at Holley. Owned by Edward Coxe, the dog was accused of attacking Bruce Seager three times in 1941. Police Justice Hubert Gillette decided that confinement was an appropriate sentence for the K-9 culprit.

May 14th
Clara Hogan of Holley received a suspended sentence on charges of embezzling money and making false entries while an employee of the Marine Trust Company.

May 14th
The Ladies Auxiliary of the St. Mary’s Club elected their officers; Theresa Romanowski, president; Martha Stucko, vice president; Mrs. Anthony Button, recording secretary; Isabel Banas, financial secretary; Clara Friday, treasurer.

100 Years Ago – 1917

May 3rd
The Medina Tribune reported the following; “Albion officers are seeing to it that the laws in that village are being abided by. The owner of the Idle Hour pool room was arrested Saturday night for being open after 11 o’clock and was fined $10.00.”

May 3rd
Notice appeared in the local newspapers regarding acceptable absences from school.… More

Orleans Hotel Site of Prohibition-era Raids

Vol. 3, Issue 22

This photograph, taken around 1920, shows the dining room of the Orleans Hotel located on the southwest corner of East Bank and Platt streets. After the Platt House burned in the early, Charles A. Harrington constructed this building in 1862/3 and operated it as a hotel. The business was originally known as the Orleans House, but records seem to indicate that the name changed to the Orleans Hotel in the 1890s when Anson R. Dunshee took ownership of the building.

Fresh on the coattails of the 18th Amendment, the United States was “enjoying” the consequences of Prohibition when this photograph was taken. Other interior photographs of the Orleans Hotel show a bar void of liquor bottles and barstools. It is no surprise, perhaps, that in 1922 the Orleans Hotel was one of six local businesses raided by Sheriff Scott Porter under the suspicion of selling illegal intoxicating liquor.… More

Oldest Photograph of Albion Shows Empire Block Before 1868 Fire

Vol. 3, Issue 21

One of the oldest images of downtown Albion, this photograph shows a busy street scene at the intersection of Batavia Street and Canal Street (now North Main and East Bank). Per an 1857 map of the Village of Albion, the block at the intersection was owned by Willis P. Collins, a grain dealer from Connecticut.

As a self-sustaining community, businesses filled the first, second, and third stories of these buildings, providing residents with convenient options for obtaining essential goods and services. On the first floor of the “Old Empire Block” was the store of W. Cole and Robert Sheldon, who operated a clothing business along with Martin Rawson and Fitch Collins. The appearance of signage hanging above the second floor windows shows the dentist office of Dr. J.S. Northrup. On the third floor, as indicated by the high-hanging signs, was the headquarters for the Orleans American, which was operated by David S.… More

Albion’s Legion Band was focal point of celebratory programs

Vol. 3, Issue 20

Established in 1920, the Sheret Post #35 American Legion Band operated for over twenty years under the direction of William Melville of Rochester. The Livonia school band director joined the organization on April 18, 1930 and remained as the director into the 1950s.

After the conclusion of World War Two, the band was an active participant in dedicatory programs and memorial parades throughout the county. During the dedication of the statue of the Blessed Mother, Our Lady of Fatima, erected on the front lawn of St. Joseph’s Rectory in May of 1947, the Legion Band led the parade and furnished a beautiful rendition of the national anthem following the ceremony.

This photograph, taken by Fred Holt, shows the Legion Band marching out of St. Joseph’s Cemetery. Annual Memorial Day exercises typically included a parade from downtown Albion, to St. Joseph’s Cemetery, and finally to Mt. Albion Cemetery where veteran gravesites were decorated.… More

Motorized Fire Apparatus Made Albion’s Department Best in the Nation

Vol. 3, Issue 19

On November 19, 1913, the Ever-Ready Manufacturing Company of Buffalo delivered a six cylinder, 90 horsepower Thomas flyer hose, chemical, and ladder truck for the Active Hose No. 2 Fire Company in Albion. At a cost of approximately $6,000, the fully-loaded vehicle was said to max out at 75 miles per hour. A year and a half prior to this delivery, Dye Hose No. 5 Fire Company purchased a similar machine, making Albion’s fire service one of the best in the United States.

This photograph shows Chief Engineer C. Royce Sawyer, right, seated in his recently purchased 1913 Buick Model 30 Roadster, which was designated as the chief’s car for the Dye Hose Company. The vehicle was equipped with a carbonated gas fire extinguisher, visible on the car’s driver-side running board.

Around the time this photograph was taken, two of Albion’s volunteer companies took out incorporation papers following village approval to do so.… More